Oct 14

The Tao of Physics: An Exploration of the Parallels between Modern Physics and Eastern Mysticism – Fritjof Capra

In this path breaking work that has stood the test of time for close to half a century now, theoretical physicist Fritjof Capra traces the mystifying parallels between Eastern mysticism and modern physics. Having as its edifice, meticulous research and jaw dropping corroborations, Capra strikes a resonance in his reader by drawing together the gospel …

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Oct 14

Release the Bats: Writing Your Way Out Of It – D.B.C. Pierre

Honesty dictates that I begin this review with a confession. This is a book ‘on writing’ unlike any that I have read till date. No, in fact to lend an even more transparent perspective, this book is unlike all the books ‘on writing’ that I have read. I cannot say that I have come out …

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Sep 29

Home Fire – Kamila Shamsie

The New York Times in showering encomiums on Kamila Shamsie’s “Home Fire” states, “Ingenious… Builds to one of the most memorable final scenes I’ve read in a novel this century.” A reading of this marvelous book reveals that it does much much more than just build up to a jaw dropping finale. Shades of Dickensian …

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Aug 17

Thank You for being late: An optimist’s guide to surviving in the age of accelerations – Thomas Friedman

Just as I was coursing through the final two Chapters of Thomas Friedman’s latest book, a brazen group of white supremacists engaged in a violent clash with nationalists in Charlotsville V.A in the United States. Nazi salutes and Ku Klux Klan tenets strode side by side as bigotry, hatred and discrimination raised their ugly heads. …

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Jul 04

Unguarded: My Autobiography – Jonathan Trott with George Dobell

While some autobiographies constitute an exercise in monotonous trumpeting of the self, there are some that traverse the path of introspection. However rare are the ones that lend a clear perspective regarding life itself. Jonathan Trott and George Dobell have successfully written a book, which, although primarily revolves around the game of cricket, transcends the …

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Jun 07

Embracing the Ordinary: Lessons From the Champions of Everyday Life – Michael Foley

Michael Foley is fast becoming a personal favourite. If “The Age of Absurdity” was a pleasant surprise, “Embracing The Ordinary” has been nothing short of a revelation. Inspired by Marcel Proust and James Joyce – terming both the ‘high priests of low life’ – Foley proceeds to highlight the myriad emotions, opportunities and joys unearthed …

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Jun 07

Dunkirk: Fight To The Last Man – Hugh Sebag-Montefiore

Hugh Sebag-Montefiore in this stirring and meticulously researched account, narrates the gallantry, grit and gumption of the British Expeditionary Forces (“BEF”) in their fierce albeit futile defense of France from rampaging German forces, before a miraculous evacuation back to British shores via Dunkirk. What makes this 75th Anniversary Edition an absolutely must have is the …

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Jun 07

The Age Of Absurdity: Why Modern Life Makes It Hard To Be Happy – Michael Foley

The modern world is all about conformity. A conformity to material trappings, a conformity to rigid norms, a stereotypical conformity with behaviour forming part of the zeitgeist of the age. The very gestalt of life has become a compliance with conformity. This is so very absurd, that it has become fashionable to conform to absurdity …

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May 28

On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft – Stephen King

The master of the macabre sets aside his chosen genre of craft and instead devotes himself to introspecting the tenets that lead to a writer accomplishing his objectives. The result is a marvelous quasi memoir; part tutelage on the art of professional authoring. Extremely readable and extraordinarily candid (Stephen King writes without inhibitions of the …

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May 28

Men Without Women: Stories by Haruki Murakami

Reading Haruki Murakami is like sampling the Durian. For the uninitiated, the Durian is an obnoxious smelling, even more obnoxious tasting, ravaged and ugly textured fruit which is glorified as the “King of Fruits” in South East Asia. There are only two categories of homo sapiens when it comes to the Durian. Those who are …

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